What’s the Most Effective Way to Reach Enlightenment? Dr. Jeffery Martin has an idea.

Non Dual Awareness, Enlightenment and Mystical Experiences – They’ve Been Around for A Very Long Time

“A category of human experience has been reported in the writings of philosophers and mystics since antiquity (Hanson, 1991; Stace, 1960). It goes by many names, including: nondual awareness, enlightenment, mystical experience, peak experience, transcendental experience, the peace that passeth understanding, unity consciousness, union with God, and so forth (Levin & Steele, 2005; MacDonald, 2000; Thomas & Cooper, 1980). These types of experiences, referred to collectively in this paper as Persistent Non-Symbolic Experience (PNSE), are often reported in spiritual and religious individuals; however, atheists and agnostics also report them (Newberg, d’Aquili, & Rause, 2001; Newberg & Waldman, 2006, 2009).

Virtually all information about these experiences comes from highly variable self-report data (McGinn, 1991; Stace, 1960). These types of experiences have traditionally been regarded as very difficult to examine scientifically. ” Jeffery A. Martin, A Continuum of Persistent Non-Symbolic Experiences in Adults, 2013

How Do You Get There?

In the video below, Dr. Jeffery Martin shares the scientific research with over 1,000 people who experience various forms of persistent non-symbolic experience have taught us about enlightenment, nonduality, and awakening, and how we’re able to help over 70% people reach these types of ongoing experience.

More information is at http://www.finderscourse.com, http://nonsymbolic.org, and http://drjefferymartin.com

About Dr. Jeffery Martin

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-5-22-16-pmDr. Jeffery A. Martin is a faculty member at Sofia University, as well as a CIIS and Harvard trained social scientist who researches personal transformation, and is a leading expert on non-symbolic consciousness (extraordinary well-being, enlightenment, nonduality, mystical experience, etc.). He specializes in bringing rigorous empirical research and testing to transformational techniques and theories that have previously been supported anecdotally. Jeffery’s academic focuses include: technology, psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, and transformative studies. A bestselling author and award winning educator, he has co-edited, authored, or co-authored over 20 books and numerous other publications; appeared in a wide variety of media; and lectured broadly in both academic and public forums.

In addition to his research and academic interests, Dr. Jeffery A. Martin is a successful entrepreneur, technologist, and business leader who has founded and sold companies in the technology, media, real estate, and wellness sectors. He currently serves in a variety of equity-based advisory positions for a range of companies within these industries.

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The Effects of Transcranial Ultrasound on Brain Disorders

lindsay-brinerBy Ph.D student Lindsay Briner

Introduction

As a student at Sofia University, who is not typically exposed to such rigorous experimental experience – it was an incredible learning experience to both have hands on experience analyzing the efficiency of the experimental design, as well as working directly with participants and collecting data.

It was also very meaningful to be working alongside Dr. Hameroff and his team, recognizing that scientific experiments are never done single handedly. It was an honor to be on the team even temporarily – to learn and to create great new friendships.

Over the last year I have been working alongside Dr. Jeffrey Martin at the Transformative Technology Lab  at Sofia University, where we are studying similar technologies on healthy people to enhance well-being. It was fascinating to dive into the other end of the spectrum of these brain technologies from a medical perspective in consideration to human pathology conversely.

Pictured below: Dr. Stuart Hameroff, Dr. Jay Sanguinetti, and Lindsay celebrating our time spent together on the TUS study.

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The Study

In April 2016, a new study was launched at the University of Arizona Center for Consciousness Studies, Effects of Transcranial Ultrasound on Memory and Mood in Cognitively-Impaired Human Subjects. I had the honor to volunteer as a Research Assistant Visiting Scholar in April and May 2016 to contribute to the study. The study is still in progress, assessing and collecting participants. The study is an uncontrolled pilot study to determine direction of future controlled clinical research.

This study is specifically investigating the effects of transcranial ultrasound (TUS) noninvasive brain stimulation on Alzheimer’s, dementia, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients for cognitive function and memory. Due to a lack of success in other approaches to resolving these neurological disorders (such as pharmaceuticals and brain training programs), non-invasive brain stimulation techniques are being explored, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) (Fregni 2005; Hameroff et al, 2013). tDCS creates a weak electric current in the brain from electrodes placed on the scalp, and has had some success in improving verbal working memory (Fregni 2005). TMS imposes a magnetic field in the brain, and has shown promise for some cognitive symptoms of depression (Guse et al, 2010). But both tDCS and TMS are inconsistent, have poor spatial resolution and lack a reliable neurophysiological mechanisms of action (Hameroff et al, 2013).

Although in this study, ultrasound stimulation is being used, which historically has only been used for medical imaging. It consists of mechanical vibrations, usually in low megahertz (MHz). Recently, there has been a plethora of both animal and human subject research utilizing ultrasound for therapeutic treatment. As well, a neuronal culture study inferring low intensity ultrasound increased neuronal growth and synaptic formation (Bucci et al, 2015). In humans, it has been found that sub-thermal TUS (~150 mW/cm2) can safely and painlessly stimulate brain activity without long-term effects or damage to the brain (Dalecki, 2007). Given the found safety, several recent studies demonstrate electrophysiological and behavioral effects of TUS on human subjects (Bystritsky, 2015; Legon et al, 2014; Tyler, 2011; Yoo, 2011). As well, the primary contributing researchers of the current study were the first to demonstrate the positive effects of TUS on mental states with human subjects (Hameroff et al, 2012, c.f. Sanguinetti et al, 2014a; 2014b).

All of these findings have been remarkably groundbreaking. Although given the dead-end treatment options for Alzheimer’s disease, a recent study on mice with genetically-induced Alzheimer’s disease was published subjugating especially interesting results. TUS was applied to the temporal cortex of the mice, resulting in a restoration of behavioral memory functions, and reduced amyloid plaques, a bio-marker for Alzheimer’s (Leinenga and Götz 2015).

One perspective on the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is where a malfunction in the tao protein creates amyloid plaque buildup in the microtubules of neural cells. This is a highly favored inference of causation for Alzheimer’s disease and therefore the findings of Leinenga and Götz (2015) have been received by the scientific community as upstanding.

The mechanism of action for TUS is unknown, although according Hameroff (2016) at the Science of Consciousness conference, speculations of mechanism could include “mechano-sensitive membrane proteins, and/or microtubules, major components of the cell cytoskeleton, and single most prevalent protein in the brain.” Microtubules are cylindrical lattices of the protein tubulin, forming Fibonacci quasi-crystals with self-similar vibrational patterns across scales, from terahertz (10^12 Hz, infra-red) to gigahertz (10^9 Hz, microwave) to megahertz (10^6Hz, radio electromagnetically, ultrasound mechanically), kilohertz (10^3 Hz, audio) and hertz (EEG) (Hameroff, 2016). These resonances of the microtubules were discovered by Anirban Bandyopadhyay’s research group at NIMS in Tsukuba, Japan; which inspired Stuart Hameroff’s current investigations as per similarity to ultrasound frequencies (2016).

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Stuart Hameroff is an anesthesiologist and professor at the University of Arizona known for his studies of consciousness.

 

 

 

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Jeffery Martin, PhD, heads the Transformative Technology Lab at Sofia University. As a Harvard trained social scientist, Jeffrey researches personal transformation who specializes in bringing rigorous empirical research and testing to transformational techniques and theories that have previously been supported anecdotally.

References

Bocchi L., Branca J. V., Pacini S., Ruggiero M. (2015). Effect of ultrasounds on neurons and microglia: Cell viability and automatic analysis of cell morphology. Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, 22, 44–53.

Bystritsky A., Korb A. S. (2015). A Review of Low-Intensity Transcranial Focused Ultrasound for Clinical Applications. Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports, 60–6.

Coronado, V. G., et al. (2012). Trends in Traumatic Brain Injury in the U.S. and the 
public health response: 1995-2009. J Safety Res, 43 (4), 299–307.

Dalecki, D. (2007). WFUMB safety symposium on echo-contrast agents:

Bioeffects of ultrasound contrast agents in vivo. Ultrasound in Med. & Biol., 33 (2), 205–213.

Edwards E.R., Spira A.P., Barnes D.E., Yaffe K. (2009). Neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild cognitive impairment: differences by subtype and progression to dementia. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry, 24, 716–722.

Eurostat. Demography report 2010. http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KE- ET-10-001/EN/KE-ET-10-001-EN.PDF (last accessed May 2014).

Fiebach C. J., Friederici A. D., Müller, K., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2002). fMRI Evidence for Dual Routes to the Mental Lexicon in Visual Word Recognition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 14 (1) 11–23.

Fleisher, A. S., Sherzai, A., Taylor, C., Langbaum, J. B. S., Chen, K., Buxton, R. B. (2009). Resting-state BOLD networks versus task-associated functional MRI for distinguishing Alzheimer’s disease risk groups. NeuroImage 47 (2009) 1678–1690

Guse, B., Falkai, P., Wobrock, T. (2010). Cognitive effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a systematic review. Neural Transm, 117, 105–122.

Hameroff S., Trakas M., Duffield C., Annabi E., Gerace M.B., Boyle P., Lucas A., Amos Q., Buadu A., Badal J.J. (2013). Transcranial ultrasound (TUS) effects on mental states: a pilot study. Brain Stimulation, 6 (3) 409–15.

Harrison, J., Minassian, S. L., Jenkins, L., Black, R. S., Koller, M., Grundman, M. (2007). A neuropsychological test battery for use in Alzheimer disease clinical trials. Arch Neurol, 64 (9), 13239.

Legon W., Sato T.F., Opitz A., Mueller J., Barbour A., Williams A., et al. (2014). Transcranial focused ultrasound modulates the activity of primary somatosensory cortex in humans. Nature Neuroscience, 17, 322–9.

Leininga G. & Götz J. (2015). Scanning ultrasound removes amyloid-β and restores memory in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. Science Translational Medicine, 7, 278–833.

Mustafa, A.G. & Alshboul, O.A. (2013). Pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury. Neurosciences (Riyadh), 18 (3), 222–34.

Penrose, R., Hameroff, S. (2011). Consciousness in the universe: Neuroscience, Quantum Space-Time Geometry and Orch OR Theory. Cosmology of Consciousness: quantum physics and the neuroscience of mind, 3, 51–103.

Pike, K. E., Rowe, C. C., Moss, S. A., Savage, G. (2008). Memory profiling with paired associate learning in alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, and healthy aging. Neuropsychology, 22 (6), 718–728.

Ready, R. E., & Ott, Brian, R. (2003). Quality of life measures for dementia. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 1 (11).

Sanguinetti J.L., Smith E., Allen John J.B., Hameroff S. (2014). Human Brain Stimulation with Transcranial Ultrasound: Potential Applications for Mental Health. Bioelectromagnetic and Subtle Energy Medicine, 2, 355–360.

Spann, P. E. J., (2016). Episodic and semantic memory impairments in (very) early Alzheimer’s disease: The diagnostic accuracy of paired-associate learning formats. Cogent Psychology, 3, 1–25.

Tyler, W.J. (2011). Ultrasound for neuromodulation: A continuum mechanics hypothesis. The Neuroscientist 17 (1), 25–36.

World Health Organization. (2012). Dementia Fact sheet N°362 http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs362/en/ (last accessed May 2014).

Woods, D. L., Kishiyama, M. M., Yund, E. W., Herron, T. J., Edwards, B., Poliva, O. et al. (2011). Improving digit span assessment of short-term verbal memory. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology33 (1), 101–111.

Yoo, S. S., Bystritsky, A., Lee, J. H., Zhang, Y., Fischer, K., Min, B. K., McDonald, N. J.,  et al. (2011). Focused ultrasound modulates region-specific brain activity. Neuroimage, 56 (3) 1267–1275.

Awakening Non-Symbolic Consciousness with Jeffery A. Martin

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Click here to watch Jeffrey Mishlove and Jeffrey Martin discuss non-symbolic consciousness.

Jeffery Martin, PhD, heads the Transformative Technology Lab at Sofia University. As a Harvard trained social scientist, Jeffrey researches personal transformation who specializes in bringing rigorous empirical research and testing to transformational techniques and theories that have previously been supported anecdotally.

Jeffery is a leading expert on intentionality and non-symbolic consciousness. He holds graduate degrees in information technology, management, and transformative studies and has co-edited, authored, or co-authored over 20 books and numerous other publications; appeared in a wide variety of electronic media; and lectured widely in both academic and public forums.

Jeffery is currently the director of the Center for the Study of Non-Symbolic Consciousness, and the Center for the Study of Intent. Portions of his research on power of thought and non-symbolic consciousness are also available in the popular fiction book, The Fourth Awakening.

Here he describes his research, beginning with neurophysiological measurements of individuals reputed to have attained a measure of spiritual enlightenment. He encountered over 200 related terms such as transcendental consciousness, god consciousness, and unity consciousness.

His primary finding concerned changes that took place deep within the brain. Much was also learned by querying participants as to how they achieved their state of well-being. This led to a specific protocol for enabling people to shift into a state of persistent well-being. He concludes by defining, in everyday language, what the experience of non-symbolic consciousness is like.

New Thinking Allowed host, Jeffrey Mishlove, PhD, is author of The Roots of Consciousness, Psi Development Systems, and The PK Man. Between 1986 and 2002 he hosted and co-produced the original Thinking Allowed public television series. He is the recipient of the only doctoral diploma in “parapsychology” ever awarded by an accredited university (University of California, Berkeley, 1980). He has served as vice-president of the Association for Humanistic Psychology, and is the recipient of its Pathfinder Award for outstanding contributions to the field of human consciousness. He is also past-president of the non-profit Intuition Network, an organization dedicated to creating a world in which all people are encouraged to cultivate and apply their inner, intuitive abilities.

Exploring Persistent Non-Symbolic Experiences

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Excerpt from Clusters of Individual Experiences form a Contiuum of Persistent Non-Symbolic Experiences in Adults by Jeffrey A. Martin of Sofia University’s Transformative Technology Lab

Persistent forms of nondual awareness, enlightenment, mystical experience, and so forth
(Persistent Non-Symbolic Experience) have been reported since antiquity. Though sporadic research has been performed on them, the research reported here represents the initial report from the first larger scale cognitive psychology study of this population.
Introduction
A category of human experience has been reported in the writings of philosophers and mystics since antiquity (Hanson, 1991; Stace, 1960). It goes by many names, including: nondual awareness, enlightenment, mystical experience, peak experience, transcendental experience, the peace that passeth understanding, unity consciousness, union with God, and so forth ( Levin & Steele, 2005; MacDonald, 2000; Thomas & Cooper, 1980).
These types of experiences, referred to collectively in this paper as Persistent Non -Symbolic Experience (PNSE), are often reported in spiritual and religious individuals; however, atheists and agnostics also report them (Newberg, d’Aquili, & Rause, 2001; Newberg & Waldman, 2006, 2009).
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image source: unknown
Virtually all information about these experiences comes from a highly variable self-reported data (McGinn, 1991; Stace, 1960). These types of experiences have traditionally been regarded as very difficult to examine scientifically. Given the number and range of research tools available it seems increasingly possible to rigorously examine these types of psychological claims. The present research set out to determine testable claims and collect detailed first person data in a way that side-stepped the religious, cultural, and other contextual ways in which PNSE is often described. Questions were asked that related to: sense of self, cognition, emotion, memory, and perception. The results suggested that similar psychological claims, in distinct groupings, were present across individuals self-reporting PNSE. These distinct groupings each appeared to offer a specific flavor of the experience.
Defining the Phrase: Persistent Non-Symbolic Experience (PNSE)
It was difficult to gain cooperation from this research population. They generally believed they would not and could not be understood scientifically. Finding language that did not push them away during their initial introduction to the research program was extremely important. Over the course of the research I tested a wide variety of words and phrases to find one that wold be widely accepted by them.
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image source: Alex Grey
The term non-symbolic was derived from Cook-Greuter’s (2000) research involving ego development and transcendence. While she generally favored the word postsymbolic, she used a term related to non-symbolic in a 2000 paper, in the following context:
Eastern psychologies have often pointed to the nonsymbolically mediated, or immediate ways of knowing as the only kind of knowing that can lead to enlightenment or true insight into human nature. In fact, they cnsider our additiction to language-mediated, discursive thought as a major hurdle in realizing the true or divine Self, or union with the Ground. (Cook-Greuter, p.230).
To read more of this article, click here.